Saturday, February 16, 2013

Stonehenge

Pen and ink was my "first love" as an artist and I return to it when I can. I like using it various ways, from bold brushwork to simple contour drawings or a combination of techniques. However, I've always admired artists who use the medium to do value drawings. I've dabbled in that in the past but I decided to try seeing what I could do with it if I applied myself to the task more often. To get started, I drew the picture of Stonehenge above. It's about 9" wide and the drawing was executed in india ink and crowquill pen on bristol. It wasn't the best bristol and was a little more absorbent than I'd prefer but it worked. The lines bled ever-so-slightly on the soft surface.

As I was working on the drawing, I also improvised a little study of standing stones to help me out. On both drawings, I limited myself to using a crowquill pen but in the future, I may try using tech pens and some brush in combination with the dip pen.

I don't consider this effort wholly successful but I'm happy with the results and I learned some things along the way. Hopefully, I can apply them to the next drawing and make it better.


11 comments:

  1. Do I detect a little Franklin Booth?

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  2. Indeed you do, although this drawing is nowhere close to Booth's level of accomplishment. What he accomplished using pen and ink is simply astounding!

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  3. Nice work Jim. I'm glad to see that you have not totally gone over to the digital side of things. :)

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  4. very amazing post, I like It, Thank you for presenting a wide variety of information that is very interesting to see in this artikle, good job adnd succes For you


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